Smart Device for Monitoring Water Use

Calliope incorporates machine learning and predictive analytics, providing insights on real-time household water use to detect leaks and save money.

Calliope’s Buoy is a connected whole-house flow meter that monitors water use. Unlike traditional leak detectors requiring multiple sensors, the meter is connected to the household water supply and is installed at the main valve only. Via an app, people can monitor their water use throughout the day.
Via a sophisticated algorithm, machine learning and predictive analytics the device measures and provides real-time data and detailed information about exactly how much water is used by which devices, offering notifications and up-to-the-minute alerts when leaks or other water waste occurs. Calliope’s technology has undergone rigorous testing, and the company will take pre-orders in June, with the first commercially available devices shipping in late summer 2016.

Relevance of solution

In California, an estimated 18% of home water waste comes from in-house leaks, annually amounting to a total 49,000 liters.1 Unless the leak is visible, it can run undetected for months, causing damage and wasting money. With homeowners having limited visibility into water wasted from significant leaks or minor-but-constant drips, the solution empowers water users to locate and fix leaks as they happen and to use water efficiently.

Triple Bottom Line

Environmental

California’s recent drought has seen policymakers urge businesses and residents to reduce water consumption. Calliope generates water savings by enabling homeowners to monitor water use and detect possible leaks.

Social

Calliope provides customers with real-time insights for water budgeting and planning, motivating water reductions by warning of upcoming price increases and educating users on site-specific wasteful practices.

Economic

Water prices in the USA have risen 33% since 2010.2 The solution provides customers with the opportunity to monitor water use, bringing down utility bills.


Sources

  1. IRWD. ”California Single Family Water Use Efficiency Study.” (2011)
  2. Circle of Blue.”WaterNews.” (2014)