Healthy Chips Made of Cricket Flour

Six Foods uses fl our made from crickets to create tortilla chip-style snacks that are nutritious and eco-friendly.

Using crickets milled into a flour to make tortilla chips, Six Foods’ snacks are healthy and have a low environmental impact. The company’s tortilla chip-style “Chirps” are made of beans, chia seeds, corn, peas, and cricket flour, and come in three flavors: Cheddar, Barbeque, and Sea Salt. With this combination of ingredients, the chips are low in fat and contain important nutrients.
In the future, the company seeks to expand its offerings and normalize cricket-based food as a healthy alternative to meat. Crickets are 70% protein, and the flour derived from them is high in calcium and iron. Aside from being healthier, producing cricket flour is also far better for the planet than meat, as crickets are 12 times more efficient in converting feed to meat than cattle.<sup>1</sup>

Relevance of solution

According to FAO, the livestock sector is responsible for 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions. Embracing cricket protein is one way to reduce the environmental footprint of the food sector, as insects generate only 1% of the greenhouse gases of livestock.2 Six Foods seeks to spur this shift by normalizing cricket consumption and showcasing insects as a healthy, affordable, and sustainable solution.

Triple Bottom Line

Environmental

Insects produce 1% of the emissions of cattle and use considerably less water.3

Social

Insects are high in protein, nutrients, fatty acids, and fiber, and can therefore help alleviate malnutrition.4

Economic

When produced at large scale, crickets costs a fraction of livestock protein by requiring less feed, space, and water.


Sources

  1. FAO. ”Edible insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security”. (2013)
  2. FAO. “Tackling climate change through livestock”. (2014)
  3. FAO. ”Edible insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security”. (2013)
  4. FAO. “The contribution of insects to food security, livelihoods and the environment”. (2013)